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Report from SHOT Show: Remington's Newest Products

By: Teresa Mull

Gunpowder Magazine stopped by the Remington booth at the SHOT (Shooting, Hunting, Outdoor Trade) Show 2019. Here's what they had to tell us about this year's newest items:

“On the 700 line, we’ve got, of course, our 700 CDL stainless fluted, and that’s a limited-edition gun that we’ve been running. This will be its 14th year. This year we’re doing it in 25-06 Remington. The 25-06 is turning 50 years old this year, so we thought it was a nice matchup there.

"One of the guns I’m really excited about is the Model Seven stainless with an HS precision stock. That’s kind of on the high-end of our Model 7 line. And our Model 7 line is a really compact, lightweight, easy-to- maneuver gun. All of them are in short-action cartridges. It’s a really nice, handy gun. It’s a great shooter, but its primary use is for hunting.

"And then on our 783 line, we’ve got the 783 Varmint, which is our 26-inch heavy barrel, with a laminate stock. Absolutely beautiful gun. We have one similar to it in the 700 line called the BLS, which is a fantastic gun, too, but this one is about half the price, so it’s a great value.”

More about these guns, from Remington's website:

MODEL 700 CDL SF
A rifle without equal and a superior performer in every way, the Model 700 CDL SF pairs a receiver machined from a solid stainless-steel bar, with a fluted barrel for reduced weight and unmatched shot-to-shot consistency.

Combined with its handsomely detailed walnut stock and a host of accuracy enhancing features, it’s become one of the world’s most popular big-game configurations for good reason.

When first introduced, the Limited Edition Model 700™ CDL™ SF LTD was so successful, customers demanded that a full line of Model 700™ CDL™ SF rifles be produced. So here they are—each made the same as our Limited Edition rifle, but without the engraved floorplate and the “Limited” markings on the receiver – now we make it in your favorite caliber.

Receiver machined from solid-steel bar stock for unrivaled uniformity and strength
Cylindrical receiver design provides a solid bedding base in the stock for consistent shot placement

Recessed bolt face locks up inside the counter-bored breech of the barrel which is surrounded by the receiver, forming “three-rings-of-steel” enclosing the cartridge case head for unparalleled strength

Integral extractor is set in a groove inside the rim of the bolt face, uniformly supporting the cartridge head

X-Mark Pro® externally adjustable trigger

24” 416 stainless steel fluted barreled action standard and short action magnum calibers and 26” long action magnum calibers

MODEL Seven CDL
HANDLES LIKE A SPORTS CAR. HITS LIKE A FREIGHT TRAIN.

Carry it in the field and you’ll understand why it’s considered one of the finest dense-cover rifles in America. Lightning-fast in close quarters and superbly accurate for the long shot, the compact, short-action Model Seven™ has been a knock-down, drag-out leader in the woods since 1983.

Its receiver and action design are based on the Model 700™ and deliver the highest level of out-of-the-box accuracy, strength and reliability in a platform that’s 2 3/8" shorter overall and weighs just 6 1/2 lbs. (standard calibers).

The Model Seven™ CDL is the quintessential short-action hunting rifle featuring a classically styled American walnut CDL stock and a clean satin-finished barrel. It’s chambered in 243 Win., 260 Remington, 7mm-08 Remington and 308 Win.

MODEL 783 VARMINT
Mirrors the Woods it was born to hunt

The Model 783 was designed by America's bolt action experts. And engineered with the precision, durability and performance enhancing technology. It's made to hunt. Born to get it done.

Features

26" Heavy Button Rifled Barrel, Free Floated
4-Round Steel Detachable Magazine
Picatinny Rail
Oversized Bolt Handle
Adjustable Crossfire Trigger
Brown Laminate Stock with Beavertail Fore end
SuperCell Recoil Pad

Teresa Mull is editor of Gunpowder Magazine. Contact her at teresa@gunpowdermagazine.com.

Disclaimer: The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Gunpowder Magazine.